This is very worthwhile.

Bill Moyers Journal . Watch & Listen | PBS

A good quote from Simon Johnson:

SIMON JOHNSON: I think it’s quite straightforward, in technical or economic terms. At the same time I recognize it’s very hard politically, okay? What you need to do is the stress test that, actually, Secretary Geithner outlined in his speech on Tuesday.

BILL MOYERS: Which is?

SIMON JOHNSON: That’s where you go and you check the bank’s books, and you say, okay, not only do we use market prices, not pretend prices, not what you wished things were worth, what they’re really worth, okay, in the market today. We use that to value your loans and the securities that you have, your assets, right?

And we also assess what will happen to the value of the things you own if there’s a severe recession. So that’s the idea, it’s a stress test, like when you go to see the doctor, they put you on a treadmill, and make you run to see how your heart is going to behave under stress.

So you’re looking at how the bank’s balance sheets will look under stress. And then you say to them, “This is our assessment of the amount of capital you need to cover your losses, and to stay in business, and be able to make loans, through what appears to be a severe recession.”

And, as the president said, we may lose a decade. So we’ve got to be very hard headed, and all the officials forecasters are still too optimistic on that. This is the amount of capital you need. Now you have a month, or two, to raise this amount of capital privately.

And when this was done in Sweden, by the way, in the early 1990s, they did it to three big banks. One of the three was able to go to its shareholders, raise a lot more capital, and stay in business as a private bank, same shareholders. That’s an option. Totally fine. However, the ones that can’t raise the capital are in violation of the terms of their banking license, if you like.

We have no problem in this country shutting down small banks. In fact, the FDIC is world class at shutting down and managing the handover of deposits, for example, from small banks. They managed IndyMac, the closure of IndyMac, beautifully. People didn’t lose touch with their money for even a moment. But they can’t do it to big banks, because they don’t have the political power. Nobody has the political will to do it.

So you need to take an FDIC-type process. You scale it up. You say, “You haven’t raised the capital privately. The government is taking over your bank. You guys are out of business. Your bonuses are wiped out. Your golden parachutes are gone.” Okay? Because the bank has failed.

This is a government-supervised bankruptcy process. It’s called, in the terminology of the business, it’s called an intervention. The bank is intervened. You don’t go into Chapter 11 because in that’s too messy. Too complicated. There’s an intervention, you lose the right to operate as a bank. The FDIC takes you over. I think we agree, everyone agrees, we don’t want the government to run banks in this country.

BILL MOYERS: Never done it before.

SIMON JOHNSON: Never done it before. It’s not gone well anywhere in the world. And the idea of getting your money out of the bank being like visiting the DMV to get your driver’s license, it’s not appealing, okay?

That’s not what we’re going to do. That’s not what the Swedes did. That’s not the state of the art – it’s not what the real banking experts are going to tell you to do. They’re going to say, you set it up, you set up the government intervention, and there’s various technical ways to do this, so that you re-privatize very quickly.

Now, it might take three months, it might take six months. It’ll depend on the overall macro economy turning around. But there’s a lot of private money out there. Let’s call it private equity.

These people would like to come in and buy these re-privatized banks. You would attach antitrust provisions to this, so the banks are broken up as part of this transaction. Senator Sanders has a great saying. He says, “Any bank that is too big to fail is too big to exist.”

And he’s exactly right. So, in this transformation, you’re bringing in private equity. You’re using, I think this is, to me, the right idea, and what we’ve learned in our country, is you’re using part of the powerful financial lobby against another part. You’re using private equity, that would do very well in this, against the inbred insider big bankers. And you’re doing this in a way so that the taxpayer decides who the new owners are.

The new owners come in and do a lot of the restructuring. They’re going to fire all of these managers. I can honestly assure you that. They’re going to put in new risk management systems. They’re going to have to make the banks smaller. And the taxpayer is going to retain a substantial equity interest. So as these banks recover the value of our investment goes up. And that’s how we get upside participation.

BILL MOYERS: So you’re not talking about nationalization, are you?

SIMON JOHNSON: I’m talking about a scaled up FDIC intervention. I think we need the FDIC to be empowered. And to have the political support necessary to get this job done.

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One Comment on “This is very worthwhile.”

  1. OmegaMom Says:

    Very apropos to my latest post. Thank you; I hadn’t seen this.


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